International Day of Charity: Theme, History and Significance

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International Day of Charity is celebrated with an aim of increasing and enhancing social responsibility across the world. It is done in solidarity to bring everyone together in supporting charitable causes. Introduced by United Nations, the day comes as a great opportunity to become a part of charity events and contribute towards the welfare of the weakest members of the society. It is celebrated every year in the memory of Mother Teresa, the renowned Noble Peace Prize winner and a champion of the distressed and needy. Mother Teresa was born Agnes Gonxha Bojaxhiu in Skopje, Macedonia, on August 27, 1910. At the time of her birth Skopje was located within the Ottoman Empire. She founded Missionaries of Charity in Kolkata in 1950, which became noted for its work among the destitute. Mother Teresa died on September 5th 1997, at 87 years of age.

History

The International Day of Charity was announced and declared by the UN General Assembly in 2012. It was created by the Hungarian Civil society initiative in 2011 with the support of the Hungarian Parliament and Government.

In the 2030 Agenda on Sustainable Development adopted in September 2015, the United Nations recognizes that eradicating poverty in all its forms and dimensions, including extreme poverty, is the greatest global challenge.

Significance

Donations and contributions by several organisations and businessmen help save and revive the lives of poor people fighting deadly diseases, protecting children, imparting education, providing food security etc. The day calls upon all members of the society to do charitable work and improve lives of others.

Charity can alleviate the worst effects of humanitarian crises, supplement public services in health care, education, housing and child protection. It assists the advancement of culture, science, sports, and the protection of cultural and natural heritage.

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